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MG parts spares and accessories are available for MG T Series (TA, MG TB, MG TC, MG TD, MG TF), Magnette, MGA, Twin cam, MGB, MGBGT, MGC, MGC GT, MG Midget, Sprite and other MG models from British car spares company LBCarCo.

MG MG Y Type - Sports Saloon

The YA was the sort of car the young professional man who had sold his TC for family reasons but still wanted a sports car. Its performance although these days is dated was very respectable when new. Even in 1960 when I purchased my car it could still see off most small saloons from Beetle's to Hillman Minx, Morris Minor etc, and when I raised the compression to 8.6 even some 1500cc cars but certainly not Alfa's or Lancia's these were far ahead of British cars. So it shouldn't be looked upon as an old mans retirement present, but a car that was usually in someone's rear view mirror trying to overtake. Bryan
B Mellem

I agree Bryan but when I bought my YB back in 1980 we were both in our 20s and there was then still a bit of give and take on the roads. I think my concern is that (post)modern drivers are so discourteous etc and seldom even indicate when they turn or change lanes. Also its nigh on impossible to keep up with a modern saloon when it comes to manoevering etc. It can be quite a challenge in any old or even oldish car to take evasive action so I try to avoid such situations by avoiding busy times and using quieter roads where possible. Having a prang in a Y is no joke...the thought of a faceful of window winder handle is too painful to consider! I do admire your youthful attitude though and your experience of owning a Y must be one of the longest - so well done that man.
D MULLEN

Its impossible to describe the difference in driving back in the 50 - 60's Hard compound tyres didn't give much grip on wet roads, most vehicles dripped oil so road junctions and corners were dodgy, but everyone was aware of this. I don't think anyone escaped the experience of skidding or bikers falling off a motor cycle. One had to anticipate hazards early on so you were always alert. Road holding of many cars like For example the Ford Popular where the axles could move sideways required a level of driving skill far beyond any modern driver. I consider the excellent design of the modern car has made todays drivers more dangerous.
B Mellem

Bryan,

I totally agree with your point that modern car make dangerous drivers.

In Holland there is a traffic psychologist that argues that the safest car in the world is a CitroŽn 2CV with a sharpened pin mounted on the steering wheel, aimed at the drivers' chest.
When even the smallest accident causes fatal injury, the driver will drive safe and alert!
Willem van der Veer

Willem I don't wish to worry you but just consider the Y type steering column in the event of a severe head on, and it did sometimes happen! many cars then were of a similar design. One of the reasons I chose a Ford 105e Anglia as a replacement was the track rod was behind the axle line and so it had a short steering shaft, and I had seen from a damaged car that the mountings would bend upwards and away from the driver.
B Mellem

Many years ago I met a guy near Bishop's Lydeard in Somerset who had a sun bronze YA and an Invicta of some sort..his YA had been modified to a B engine and had a modified steering column with a Universal Joint that as per post 1960s cars would snap in the event of a collision thus preventing the column being pushed towards the driver. Always wondered if the car still exists. I seem to recall getting some Y parts from a scrapyard near by...wish I had taken the details down now for the record.
D MULLEN

Bryan,
In my earlier post I wanted to include the Y, but didn't want to clutter the text...

Two years ago I had a near death experience in the Y when I was driving with my wife to a rally.
An oncoming car driven by an extremely old lady was overtaking a lot of cars and somehow she didn't see the Y or she just panicked because she kept driving towards us at probably 50 mph.
To avoid a collision I steered to the very edge of the road that was lined by very soft verges and the old ladies' car narrowly missed us by a few inches.
I am absolutely certain that a head-on collision there would have cost us our lives.

After a while, when my heart-rate was below 150 I was able to exclaim: 'phew, that was close' and my wife agreed heartily.
Willem van der Veer

I do now regret referring to the cars safety in view of your dreadful experience and thank heavens for your swift reaction. When the Y was built road speeds were very much lower than today which gave more time for the brain to react or perhaps more accidents would have occurred. The cars now give a false sense of security and even worse convinces the driver into thinking themselves more competent than they really are. If it were possible anyone who boasts that they can handle a car at 100 mph would try it in a Lagonda or Bentley on cross plys and Luvax dampers, that would sort out the real men from the bigheads. As we know even the Y at 70 in original trim becomes a handful. Very well done Willem, sounds to me you are a pilot.
B Mellem

This thread was discussed between 27/02/2015 and 04/03/2015

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